Marty on the Left and his brother Dallas on the right
Performing at the 101 Ranch Rodeo in1978
ANNOUNCER: Clem McSpadden  
GRAND MARSHAL: Clem McSpadden
RODEO QUEEN: Sheri Howell  
SPECIALTY ACT: Joe Zoppe

Kid's father, grandfather and great-grandfather were all directors and performers in the Wild
West Show business, with names like Pawnee Bill, Buffalo Bill and Geronimo.  Kid grew up in
Ponca City, home of the historic 101 Ranch. He's also has relative ties to Will Rogers by way of
his Grandmother Delia McSpadden. Performance genes, a witty outlook and care for his fellow
man have trickled down through the generations, and the Kid is having a ball continuing his
family's legacy.

Kid has been roping in one form or another for over thirty years. He has been asked to perform
in a wide variety of venues around the world. Even George W. Bush proves to be a fan. In 2009
he Invited Marty (Kid) and his family to attend the 4th July celebration in Woodward Oklahoma.

He was riding a horse before he could walk and at the age of six years old he was in the rodeo
arena in the Little Britches Rodeo Association. He rode his first Bare Back Bucking Horse (Pony)
at that time. He later went on to be a professional team roper and rough stock rider. He learned
trick roping from his father Raymond and grandfather Orlan, then went on to be professionally
trained at the 101 Ranch by Mike Sokal another original performer. Because he grew up in the
center of a wild west show legacy, he realized the heritage was his to keep alive.
From his relatives, he heard first-hand stories about the likes of Pawnee Bill, Buffalo Bill and
Annie Oakley, and he was always surrounded by original photographs of wild west performers.
He tells the story of Geronimo, who eventually rode in the parade with the president and shot
his last buffalo from an automobile. According to the Kid, during shows Geronimo would offer a
thousand dollars to any man who would offer to be scalped; of course no one volunteered.
Then there's the story of Annie Oakley, a trick shooter who was the first woman to win a
competition against a man in a shooting contest. The Kid also recalls stories of the 101 Ranch in
Ponca City, once the largest ranch in the United States, where he was raised.
Kid is working on a second book telling in depth the hidden stories about the Wild West and
why it was called Wild. For many years Kid read books of others interpretation of the turn of the
century and he could not believe what they said. Many of the stories were told to protect land
and reputations. Kid knows from the history passed on to him that the west was actually even
more wild than what was published.
In the late 70s the 101 Ranch
Rodeo was a family event  that
included greased pool climb and
money scramble as pictured.
By GARRON MARSH
Press Staff Writer

Since the late 1800s, wild west shows have captivated audiences
across the U.S.  and trick roping has been a part of the
action since the beginning.
In years past, being handy with a rope was a necessary skill for many
American cowboys and ranchers to have. It is likely that, at some
point, a few of these cowboys wanted to show off their mastery of the
lasso to their buddies.
Eventually, what began as a simple pastime developed into a source of
entertainment, and even competition, for turn-of-the-century
Americans across the country.
On a wet Wednesday in Hulbert, many kids and adults were able to
catch a glimpse of this increasingly rare art form when Marty Tipton,
aka the Oklahoma Kid, rode into town.
Tipton gave the audience a brief look into the history of the wild
west, and more specifically Oklahoma itself. He showed the kids
several pictures of famous wild west personalities, and explained how
they were all connected to the Wild West entertainment business.
After that, Tipton showed off some of his trick roping skills, and
even got the kids involved with some tricks of their own – all with
the intention of “roping” them into learning a little more about
their history.
“I like to bring the history and comedy into the program along with the
trick roping,” said Tipton. “I talk about these famous names, and the kids
come back to the library to read more about them.”
Tipton is a fourth-generation wild west show performer, and his
family ties to this livelihood stretch back more than 120 years.
“My grandfather was a performer and producer with the original Pawnee
Bill Wild West Show, and the Two Bill’s Wild West Show featuring
Pawnee Bill and Buffalo Bill,” Tipton said.
Tipton’s grandfather also worked with several other notorious western
personalities, such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, Bill Pickett,
Tom Mix and even Geronimo.
If that isn’t enough of a family legacy, Tipton has relative ties to
Oklahoma icon Will Rogers, who was a trick roper himself, so it’s
easy to see how he got into this line of work.
“I’ve been performing shows since I was nine years old,” said Tipton.
“I recently started with the performing for private programs after I was
asked to do a show at a birthday party for Toby Keith. Someone saw me
there and asked if I could come and do a children’s program. There,
someone else saw the show, and pretty soon, the program just kind of
took off. I’ve got 65 shows over the next 60 days.”
Tipton noted it was no big surprise that he’d be so busy doing trick
roping exhibitions.
“My family has been doing this for over 100 years,” said Tipton. “When
someone wants a trick roper, they know where to go.”
The Hulbert brought Tipton in to perform as a part of
their Oklahoma Centennial celebrations during their summer reading
program, and their efforts seem to have paid off.
“I liked the show and I learned a lot about the wild west and trick roping,”
said
Hulbert resident Trey Freed.
As for the Oklahoma Kid’s performance ability goes, the results speak
for themselves.
“It was fun,” said Shady Grove resident Rob Clark. “And I learned that
it’s not easy to twirl a rope but have learned how!”
.
Celebrate Oklahoma!
By April Wilkerson
Staff Writer
Web-Posted Sep. 21, 2007 04:10: AM

Trick roper brings wild west legacy to Shawnee Like his distant relative Will Rogers,
Shawnee resident Marty Tipton uses an uplifting saying in his public performances:
"It's not always how fast you run or how high you climb; it's how you bounce."
Tipton, also known as The Oklahoma Kid, is a trick roper, joke teller and all-around
motivational kind of guy. More than 100 years of family history have prepared him
for his career of entertainment combined with a unique historical perspective.
Tipton's father, grandfather and great-grandfather worked with Pawnee Bill's Wild
West Show, and Tipton grew up in Ponca City, home of the historic 101 Ranch. He's
also related to Will Rogers by marriage in his grandmother's generation.
Performance genes have trickled down through the generations, and Tipton is
having a ball, especially in Oklahoma's centennial year, continuing his family's legacy.
He will perform in Shawnee this weekend during local centennial celebrations.
"I love people and I love Oklahoma," Tipton said. "I try to give a good image for our
fine state. I like to see things happen in the world that won't happen by us sitting
around."
Like his distant relative Will Rogers, Shawnee resident Marty Tipton uses an uplifting
saying in his public performances: "It's not always how fast you run or how high you
climb; it's how you bounce."

Tipton has been roping in one form or another for 31 years. He was riding a horse
before he could walk, he said, and at 6 he was in the rodeo arena. He later went on
to be a professional team roper, bull rider and bullfighter. He learned trick roping
from his father and grandfather, then went on to be professionally trained at the 101
Ranch by Mike Sokel another original trick roper from the 101 Wild West show.
Because he grew up in the center of a wild west show legacy, he didn't always think
too much of it, he said. But as he got older, he realized the heritage was his to keep
alive. From his relatives, he heard first-hand stories about the likes of Pawnee Bill,
Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley, and he was always surrounded by original
photographs of wild west performers.
"As I got older, I realized it was my responsibility to my family and to Oklahoma to
continue the legacy of the wild west shows," he said. "I do some trick roping and tell
the history of wild west shows and Oklahoma, and my family relationship to that."
Tipton even holds a world's record: He's taught more students how to rope than
anybody else, including a recent Oklahoma show for 6,000 students from 51 schools
in Durant Oklahoma with former Governor Brad Henry.
But his performances are about much more than providing a historical perspective.
Tipton's heart is with people who need a hand up in life, and he weaves inspirational
messages, and a theme of equality, through his performances. His ancestors worked
with a multicultural cast in the wild west shows, from the African-American Bill Pickett
to Geronimo, an Indian, to Annie Oakley, who could out-shoot any man. It took lots
of different people many of them once maligned by the world to put on the shows.
"I want to tell of a world that started to open up to all cultures," Tipton said.
Tipton also uses his performances to benefit Children's Hospital in Oklahoma City
and Project Safe in Shawnee. Proceeds from the sale of ropes go to Children's
Hospital, where Tipton plans to visit and give roping lessons.
"A lot of kids go in the hospital, and some won't come out," he said. "They need
some hope."
Tipton also promotes literacy and sends out a message to youth that if they've been
knocked down, they need to get up and keep trying. Many youngsters are on the
fast track to success, he said, but others have to overcome obstacles before they
meet their goals.
"That's why I say it's how high you bounce in life," he said. "Everyone has a hard
time in one way or another growing up, and some people stay down. Life is like
riding a horse. If the horse throws you off, you have to keep getting back on until he
doesn't throw you anymore."
Shawnee News-Star
Hulbert News
His first rodeo as trick roper was at the 101
Ranch Wild West Pro-Rodeo, when he was 9
years old, but he started performing at age 5,
tap dancing and jazz dancing. By age 8, his
“hobo dance act” made the top 10 in a
national talent contest among adult
performances. Tipton started competing in
rodeos while in first grade riding bucking
ponys in the Little Britches Rodeo Association.
He went on to compete in team roping and
bull riding throughout high school on into
college until he took up being a rodeo clown
and bullfighter for Wrangler we he found his
knack for making audiences laugh. As part of
the show required him to be “shot” in the rear
end with a shotgun. At the right moment,
Tipton would hit an igniter that would blow
up the seat of his pants. “Sometimes, my shirt
would catch on fire and I would have to roll
around a bit, and a lot of the time I got burnt.
But it was a great act and the crowd loved it,”
he remembers.
Oklahoma Kid,” carries on the family business with style. The trick-roper and
comedian has performed thousands of shows across the nation, adding his own
chapter to his storied pedigree with his sharp wit and a unique message.
“It’s not always how fast you run in life, or how high you climb, but how you
bounce,” is Tipton’s mantra. When poor health forced him to live in an oxygen tent
for much of his sixth year of life, he didn’t have much contact with the outside
world, but he had a trick rope and a cap gun and those proved to be ingredients
for stardom. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Tipton grew up on the legendary 101
Ranch in Ponca City, or that his great-grandfather worked with Buffalo Bill and
Geronimo, or that his grandfather worked with Pawnee Bill, or that his dad was a
rodeo world champion, or that he has relative ties to Will Rogers. One might think
spinning lassos is embedded in Tipton’s DNA.
Marty Tipton is an internationally renowned performer and speaker known for
his high-energy and insightful content spiked with humor. He prides himself
on bringing back the common sense finds time to be a Cirque du Soleil artist
on the Oklahoma Strip and abroad. This trick roping cowboy has been in
entertainment business since over 35 years. He has been performing cowboy
rope tricks publicly ever since age around 9 years old.
Now an author, television segment host, and certified performance coach so
don't be fooled the values and skills of the West are in his blood and are his
true passion. Tipton's forefather performed in shows like the original Pawnee
Bill and Buffalo Bill Wild West Show the 101 Ranch Wild West Show as well as
the Tom Mix Circus.Tipton likes using a cotton rope for his act, which he says
was a favorite of Will Rogers. (Rogers, I’m sure you know, was a popular
writer, comedian and actor and authentic cowboy, who started his career
making political jokes while performing rope tricks.)
He shares the western arts of trick roping, lasso rope spinning, and whip
cracking with a good dose of humor. The Oklahoma Kid Cowboy Humorist
performance is perfect for motivating a crowd and adding excitement to an
event. His presentations are always extremely energetic and highly interactive.
The Oklahoma Kid western theme party ideas can transform your western
party dreams into a reality. With a wagon load of experience planning and
coordinating unforgettable western themed parties and events, we’ll bring the
Wild West alive for your special event.
St. Louis Times
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invited Tipton to spend July 4 shooting fireworks with him in Woodward, but Tipton was already
scheduled to perform at a convention with Shooter Jennings (Waylons son) and refused to back
out of a contract.

Tipton entertains patients at places like The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center and the Troy
Aikman Center as often as he can. He relates to the young cancer and transplant patients, glassed
off in quarantine, because of his year in the oxygen tent as a boy. I’v been there,” he says.

He remembers one little girl had been crying all day and night, and when he gave her a trick rope
on one of his visits, Tipton says he had her laughing and smiling. “I like to see kids that have been
crying, smile,” he relates. “That’s what’s closest to my heart, to help people like that who are in
trouble.”

Once, Tipton was eating at a pizza place and the manager came up to him. The man said his
daughter was at one of the treatment centers Tipton had visited and that his daughter had gotten
well. The girl’s dad offered Tipton free pizza for the rest of his life, but he refused. That’s not why
he does it. “It’s really the only thing that makes me feel good, is to help someone else,” he says.

Tipton got involved with charity work through the urging of his pastor and Speaker of the House
here in Oklahoma. After dodging death a few times — his childhood illness, a parachute
malfunction during Operation Just Cause, getting caught in a shootout in Panama, rolling his car
and getting mauled by a bull — Tipton wondered if God kept him alive for a reason. “He saved my
life,” Tipton believes, “There have been several occasions that I should have died and I feel God
kept me alive because he had a plan for my life.”
home of the historic 101 Ranch. He's also has relative ties to Will Rogers by way of his Grandmother
Delia McSpadden. Performance genes, a witty outlook and care for his fellow man have trickled down
through the generations, and the Tipton is having a ball continuing his family's legacy.

Tipton has been roping in one form or another for over thirty years and performing comedy for over
10 years. He has been asked to perform in a wide variety of venues across the country. Even George
W. Bush proves to be a fan. He Invited Marty and his family to attend the 4th July celebration in
Woodward Oklahoma. He was riding a horse before he could walk and at the age of six years old he
was in the rodeo arena in the Little Britches Rodeo Association. He rode his first Bare Back Bucking
Horse (Pony) at that time. He later went on to be a professional team roper and rough stock rider.

Tipton learned trick roping from his father Raymond and grandfather Orlan, then went on to be
professionally trained at the 101 Ranch by Mike Sokal another original performer. Because he grew
up in the center of a wild west show legacy, he realized the heritage was his to keep alive. From his
relatives, he heard first-hand stories about the likes of Pawnee Bill, Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley, and
he was always surrounded by original photographs of wild west performers. He tells the story of
Geronimo, who eventually rode in the parade with the president and shot his last buffalo from an
automobile. According to the Tipton, during shows Geronimo would offer a thousand dollars to any
man who would offer to be scalped; of course no one volunteered. Then there's the story of Annie
Oakley, a trick shooter who was the first woman to win a competition against a man in a shooting
contest. The Tipton also recalls stories of the 101 Ranch in Ponca City, once the largest ranch in the
United States, where he was raised.

Tipton is working on a second book telling in depth the hidden stories about the Wild West and why
it was called Wild. For many years Tipton read books of others interpretation of the turn of the
century and he could not believe what they said. Many of the stories were told to protect land and
reputations. Tipton knows from the history passed on to him that the west was actually even more
wild than what was published. To this day Tipton travels full time speaking and doing rope spinning
demonstrations. Tipton is a living legend and his story is not over.
The Oklahoman
Oklahoma Kid objective is to keep sharing our customs and to ingrain social pride and
Kid Entertainment offers variety of programs designed to entertain, enlighten and
community. We offer outstanding entertainment in across America and now offering
appearances internationally. "Floreo de Soga" (Trick Roping).
presents rises above hindrances of dialect and social by bringing new and advancing
points of view of our customs and history to all groups of audience.
The Oklahoma Kid is likewise glad to offer the expert display of the customary
specialty of Trick Roping otherwise called "Floreo de Soga". There is additionally a
touch of the customary western subject gathering thoughts that highlights the most
energizing moves of rope tricks. It comprises of a few distinct deeds including Riding
(when accessible), Roping, Accuracy, Courage and Style. Our trick roping  restricting
show is intended to highlight the most energizing segments of the west. These
comprise of world winning reserving traps and moves performed by the incredibly
famous craftsman "Marty Tipton"
Tipton's goal was to present ‘Western’ Oklahoma kid entertainment at its highest level
with the presentation and production similar to a Broadway show, except this show
takes place in large arenas enhanced with flashing lights and exciting music and
thousands of spectators. Our audiences love it.  They stand in long lines for an
autographed poster or photo with our performers.  They tell us it brings back great
memories when they were kids watching the Cowboy Heroes on TV and movies and
they want their kids and grand kids to have that kind of experience, and they do.

Marty Tipton have spent his entire life performing and being involved in the Western
lifestyle. Before creating the Great Oklahoma Kid show he had spent over 30 years
as one of the
top Professional rodeo announcers in the Country.  Tipton has perfected his cowboy
lasso spinning performance after decades of training. He also has relative ties to the
legendary Will Rogers by way of his Grandmother McSpadden so it's no wonder why
trick roping and humor in his blood.

The spectacular arena shows are the trademark but the Great Oklahoma Kid Show
has been featured in many versions for venues like the Annual 2015 NORDAM
Aerospace banquet in Tulsa Oklahoma, Marty "The Oklahoma Kid" Tipton works a
lasso Friday while performing for an audience at the Ardmore OK, to performances at
The Autry Museum Los Angeles California and many more.  The Great Oklahoma Kid
Show played to sell-out crowds at Oklahoma city National Western for many years.

Producing the Great Oklahoma kid Western Show is a self owned operation writing
the scripts, producing the music, designing lighting and special effects, booking show
dates and always looking for new ways to make it all more thrilling and exciting year
after year.  He is also the show production manager keeping the shows flowing and
working closely with the performers under him.
For generations Tipton's forefathers performed in and were event directors for legendary shows
like the Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show, 101 Ranch Wild West Show, Buffalo Bill Wild West Show,
Tom Mix Circus the Vaudeville Stage and Broadway Productions. The art of humor and rope
spinning runs in the family and in fact he has relative ties to the famous trick roper and actor of
the 1930s Will Rogers. For generations Tipton's forefathers performed in and were event
directors for legendary shows like the Performance genes have trickled down through the
generations and are clearly evident when you see him speak and perform. If you ever seen a
someone engaging with the audience and twirling a rope at the same time it was probably
Tipton. Since Will Rogers himself Tipton is the only cowboy known to crack up an audience
while spinning a lasso. He has performed in just about every type of venue imaginable making
crowds laugh in everything from professional sports games to the Broadway productions like the
Will Rogers Follies. In 2014 Tipton toured from New York to L.A. directing and performing in
televised appearances across the nation including ABC Good Morning America and the Travel
Chanel Touring America. Tipton has taken the art of trick roping to new extremes like nothing
ever seen before.
Marty Tipton Bio
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